Monday, March 2, 2009

Parent of the Year award goes to...

So I returned home from Denver last night to a lovely family reunion. Dennis had cleaned the whole house while I was gone, including all the bathrooms, and dinner was ready when we walked in the door. The kids, he said, had been just great while I was gone, helping him out and not even fighting that much. All was well, and then...

The fighting began. Chiara was screaming at Olivia in the family room, "Open your eyes! Open your eyes!" When Olivia did not open her eyes or respond to questions, Chiara ran into the kitchen to tattle. Dennis and I immediately called to Olivia and asked, Why? Why? WHY???!!!??? wouldn't she just answer and look at her sister. We told her to go to her room, and she did, crying hysterically the whole way. When the crying continued to get louder and more frantic, I went up there to put an end to the insanity. That's when Olivia told me, through barely contained sobs, that the reason she had her eyes closed and was not talking was because she was following the instructions in the Centering Prayer book I brought home for the kids from Denver.

That's right folks. We punished our daughter for practicing Centering Prayer. Can anyone top that? I really doubt it.

3 comments:

MB said...

Oh, trust me, there are moments here as well!! Thanks for sharing your story so the rest of us realize we are all different yet all the same!

Jean L. said...

I've been laughing about this for 2 days, Mary. It's just all part of what makes it "real". Thanks for the window into your "real" world...it's a wonderful place to visit!
Jean

Roxane B. Salonen said...

I read this when you first posted but didn't have time to comment. But I just wanted to affirm MB that we all have had "Parent of the Year" moments. Truly, you are not alone. Does missing your preschoolers first concert count? I fell to my knees when I realized it was over just as I was arriving, because I'd gotten the time wrong. I can never repeat that moment. But, we need to give ourselves a few passes, I think. We probably will remember these "failed" moments better than our kids. Perhaps we should let them go, too (I'm talking to myself here...).